Greyhound facts:

Greyhounds were an integral part of ancient Egyptian life, as depicted in art dating back to 3,000 B.C.

Gentle and peaceful, greyhounds make wonderful family pets. One of them even lived in the White House in the mid-1800s

Greyhounds were closely linked with the jackal god, Anubis. When domesticated, they were often buried with solemn pageantry and were said to pass into an afterlife known as the Field of Reeds and thereby live forever.

Mentioned In Egyptian Times

Greyhounds have been man's companions for such a long period of time that they are even mentioned in the earliest of ancient texts, including the Bible. Experts suggest that the breed dates back about 4,000 years to the heydays kingdoms of Egypt, Greece and Persia. Greyhounds became so revered by royalty, that they were often found in depictions of royal courts, and in some cases they were even found mummified in ancient Egyptian tombs, where they were preserved as companions for their former owners in the afterlife.

Greyhounds In the Middle Ages

Prior to the Middle Ages, it appeared as though these swift hounds lost their place among the great halls of the privileged, especially when many famines swept the lands. Yet the resilient breed over time once again endeared themselves to royalty, and again became features in their courts.

Moreover, the nobles became so enamored of their phenomenal hunting dogs that it was a capital offense to kill a greyhound. Human life at times was valued less than the life of one such dog. Before long, commoners were forbidden from owning these dogs, and it was only the noble who had permission from the king to own and breed greyhounds. Prior to the Middle Ages, it appeared as though these swift hounds lost their place among the great halls of the privileged, especially when many famines swept the lands.